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  • Researchers find link between early childhood diet and IQ

    According to a recent study, kids who consume diets that are high in fats, sugars and processed foods in early childhood may have a lower IQ, compared to those who eat diets that are rich in vitamins and nutrients. The findings, which are published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, utilize data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. more...

  • Video game addiction affecting children and teens worldwide

    New research from Iowa State University suggests that video game addiction is becoming a growing problem globally, and risk factors include longer time spent playing, lower social competence and greater impulsivity. more...

  • Study shows genetic variation in depressed individuals

    New research from the University of Michigan reveals that individuals with major depressive disorder may produce lower levels of the brain molecule neuropeptide Y (NPY), which has been shown to restore calm after stressful events. As a result, these people are less resilient to the effects of stress. more...

  • Research suggests recession has impact on mental health of lower socio-economic groups

    As a result of the recent recession, many teens and adults in underserved socio-economic groups have experienced heightened levels of financial stress. In an effort to uncover the effects that an economic crisis has on the mental health of populations, researchers examined how inequalities in socio-economic status affect overall well-being. more...

  • Antipsychotic medications may cause loss of brain matter in schizophrenic patients

    People with schizophrenia are often prescribed antipsychotic medications as part of their treatment. However, new research suggests that these drugs may cause the loss of a measurable amount of brain tissue over time. more...

  • Many Super Bowl ads contained content not suitable for young viewers

    Over the past weekend, many families watched the Super Bowl together. However, many of the commercials that were aired during the game were violent or contained advertisements for alcohol and erectile dysfunction medications. more...

  • Research suggests exposure to criminal justice system may increase risk of suicide

    Past research has suggested that prisoners in the criminal justice system have an increased risk of attempting or committing suicide. However, scientists from the University of Manchester in England have studied the effects of being in the criminal justice system - regardless of verdict or prison sentence - on mental health. more...

  • Study shows many autistic young adults stop receiving care after teen years

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that an average of one in 110 children in the U.S. have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, many of these children stop receiving care once they enter adulthood. In an effort to uncover the extent to which this occurs, researchers from Washington University collected data via phone surveys from the guardians of young adults between the ages of 19 and 23 who have an ASD. more...

  • Blogging site releases report on teens, money and stress

    According to a study called Confronting Teen Stress, Meeting the Challenge in Baltimore City, schoolwork, parents, friends' problems, romantic relationships and drugs in the neighborhood cause adolescents the greatest amount of anxiety. However, finances are also a source of stress for many teens. more...

  • Kids raised in difficult home environments may overcome challenges with high-quality nonmaternal child care

    Past research suggests that children who grow up in homes with limited family resources are at a greater risk of developmental problems than their peers who are raised in houses with high-quality child care. According to a new study from the University of Denver, Georgetown University, Harvard University and Auburn University, improved child care may help make up for low-quality home environments. more...

  • Teens who work more than 20 hours may be risking their academic future and mental health

    High school students frequently participate in part-time work in order to provide themselves with spending money or save funds for college. However, adolescents who work too much may be jeopardizing their academic future and their mental health. more...

  • Violent Super Bowl ads may influence children to be aggressive

    Each year, the Super Bowl brings families together around the television. However, the content of many Super Bowl commercials may not be suitable for young viewers. Research from Iowa State University suggests that violent content in television commercials may influence aggressive thoughts in children. more...

  • New study reveals Facebook's impact on teenage girls' self-esteem

    According to the National Eating Disorders Association, as many as 10 million women are fighting a life-or-death battle with some type of eating disorder. In an effort to uncover the environmental and social factors that cause these negative behaviors, researchers from the University of Haifa in Israel studied Facebook's influence on young women. more...

  • Homosexual teens may have an increased risk for depression and suicidal ideation

    Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) teens can have a set of developmental challenges that are unique to this group. For example, research from Concordia University suggest that LGB adolescents have an increased risk for severe mental problems as a result of being victimized, rejected and abused. more...

  • Research suggests genetics play a role in school effectiveness

    According to the Twins Early Development Study at King's College London Institute of Psychiatry, the academic success of students may be determined by genetic factors. The study, which is published in the journal PLoS ONE, used data on school performance from 4,000 pairs of twins. more...

  • Foster kids can benefit from receiving support through age 21

    Children in foster care who are not adopted by their 18th birthday are often released from care with little to no support. In an effort to give these children an opportunity to become independent before going into the adult world, an expert in the field and professor from the University of Missouri is campaigning for an extension of foster care benefits to 21 years old. more...

  • Research suggests HIV-positive teens are more likely to get pregnant than their healthy peers

    According to new research in the Journal of the American Medical Association, teenage and young adult women with HIV have higher incidents of pregnancy than their healthy peers. In addition, HIV-positive women have a greater risk for complications during pregnancy. more...

  • New law requires companies to cover autism treatment for children of employees

    Many parents of autistic children struggle financially to properly care for their children. However, this week, the Virginia House passed legislation that requires some employer health care plans to cover treatment for autistic children, The Associated Press reports. more...

  • Researchers find genetic variation in genomes of individuals with schizophrenia

    New research from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified gene mutations that are linked to schizophrenia. For the study, which is published in the journal Nature, scientists scanned copy number variants (CNVs) - a type of genetic variation in which the number of copies of a gene differs between individuals - in the genomes of 8,290 individuals with schizophrenia and 7,431 healthy controls. more...

  • Study shows how Ritalin can help rats with iron-deficiency-related attention problems

    Ritalin has traditionally been used in the treatment of adults and children with attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, researchers from Penn State have recently conducted studies in which rats with iron deficiency-induced attention problems were treated with Ritalin. more...

  • Study may help in development of sleep apnea treatments

    Teens and young adults who experience problems sleeping are at a higher risk for developing mental health issues, such as depression. However, new research from the University of Toronto may provide relief for sleep apnea sufferers. more...

  • Study suggests girls can benefit from playing video games with their parents

    New research from Brigham Young University's School of Family Life suggests that girls may benefit from playing video games with their parents. For the study, which is published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, authors surveyed 287 families with an adolescent child between 11 and 16 years old. more...

  • White House Drug Czar warns U.S. about "bath salts" craze

    A new drug craze called "bath salts" are slowly making their way into mainstream culture. This week, White House Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske warned people about taking the drug, which is often sold on the Internet and in paraphernalia shops, the Associated Press reports. more...

  • Drug Free AZ releases list of potential drug use warning signs for parents

    In recent weeks Drug Free Arizona has released a list of signs that could help parents determine if their child is abusing drugs. The organization also suggests that parents ask their children outright if they have been using drugs or alcohol. Additionally, it suggests that parents consider getting a professional assessment of their child. more...

  • Study suggests mice that are missing a stress molecule can help in developing treatments for depression

    New research presented at the annual Neuroscience 2010 meeting suggests that mice who lack a molecule involved in regulating nerve cell signaling are better equipped to handle stressful situations. more...

  • National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression awards grants for mental health studies

    According to the National Institute of Mental Health, just over 20 percent children have had a seriously debilitating mental disorder either currently or at some point during their life. In response to these figures, the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD)'s Brain and Behavior Research Fund is awarding $12.6 million in new research grants. more...

  • Research suggests diet may trigger mental illness

    A new study by Purdue University suggests that changes in diet can reduce abnormal behavior in people or animals who suffer from mental illness. In fact, researchers found that diet may be also be a trigger for mental illness. more...

  • Researchers find potential new treatments for depression

    In recent months, researchers have found a new neurosurgical treatment that could help people who are affected by depression. A team of experts from the School of Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol and the Department of Neurosurgery at North Bristol NHS Trust are currently developing new antidepressants, deep brain stimulation (DBS) treatments and stereotactic neurosurgery. more...

  • Parents who share caregiving may contribute to an unsupportive relationship

    According to new research from Ohio State University, families in which the mother is the primary caregiver of preschool-aged children may experience less conflict than those in which the parents share responsibility. For the study, the scientists surveyed 112 Midwestern couples who had a four-year-old child. more...

  • Unhealthy relationships may affect mental and physical well-being

    Teens who grow up in unstable households may be at a higher risk for developing mental illnesses. However, unhealthy relationships affect both parents as well. more...

  • Children whose fathers work overtime may exhibit bullying behaviors

    Recent research suggests that bullies may be a product of their father's work schedule. According to a study from Vanderbilt University, children who believe that their fathers work too much may exhibit bullying behaviors. more...

  • Rethink Autism launches free webinar for parents and teachers of children with an ASD

    According to a study published in the journal Pediatrics, an estimated 637,000 children between the ages of 3 and 17 in the U.S. - or one in 91 - were diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in 2007. This figure shows a 67 percent increase from 2002, when the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network estimated that one in 150 children were diagnosed with the disease. more...

  • NAMI offers free course for family members of individuals with mental illnesses

    Parents of teens who suffer from a mental illness may be at risk for developing health problems as a result of caring for a disabled child. However, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) is offering a free 12-week course for family members and partners of those who have been diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, Peninsula Daily News reports. more...

  • Young adults who commit violent crimes may demonstrate warning signs of mental illness

    In recent years, the media has focused on tragedies in which young people commit horrible crimes. For example, in Tuscon, 22-year-old Jared Lee Loughner went on a shooting spree, which left six people dead and 14 injured, according to USA Today. more...

  • Research links stress to depression

    According to new research published in the journal Neuron, complex molecular mechanisms that are associated with chronic stress may help scientists find new treatments for depression. more...

  • Legislators decide how to punish teens found guilty of "sexting"

    A survey conducted in 2008 by teen magazine Cosmo Girl and the National Campaign revealed that 39 percent of teens between the ages of 13 and 19 admit to having sent a sexually explicit message or picture in the past. The study also revealed that boys are more likely to receive sexts, while girls are more likely to send them. more...

  • Caffeinated beverages may pose health risks to teens, according to researchers

    Despite the media's recent focus on caffeinated alcoholic beverages, such as Four Loko, many experts agree that energy drinks alone can be a danger as well. According to researchers from the University of Maryland School of Public Health and Wake Forest University School of Medicine, highly-caffeinated beverages are often consumed with alcohol by teens and young adults. more...

  • Study shows that consumption of unhealthy fats may contribute to increased risk of depression

    New research from scientists at the universities of Navarra and Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, reveals that a diet of unhealthy foods may contribute to the risk of suffering from depression. more...

  • Study shows many teens do not receive treatment for mental health disorders

    According to a new study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, many American teens who suffer from mental health issues are not treated for their conditions. For the research, scientists surveyed 6,483 adolescents who were between the ages of 13 and 18. more...

  • Abuse of bath salts is becoming a dangerous new drug trend

    An alarming new trend is putting many teens in danger. In states across the U.S., people are snorting, smoking and injecting bath salts in order to get high. However, the chemicals in these products can lead to hallucinations, paranoia, rapid heart rates and suicidal thoughts, according to the Chicago Sun Times. more...

  • Health organization makes online resource for pregnancy information

    The Guttmacher Institute reports that the U.S. has the highest levels of teen pregnancy among developed nations. In order to curtail this issue, many local governments are launching preventive programs. For example, the St. Lawrence County Health Initiative in New York is aiming to make more information about reproductive health and pregnancy available online, the Watertown Daily Times reports. more...

  • School district partners with police to prevent teen drug use

    The Office of National Drug Control Policy reports that mental health problems, including depression, developmental lags, apathy, withdrawal and other psychosocial dysfunctions, are frequently linked to substance abuse among adolescents. As a result, many school districts are implementing programs to prevent teen drug and alcohol use. more...

  • New research suggests psychopaths and brain injury sufferers have similar characteristics

    In an effort to find treatments for people who are diagnosed as psychopathic, researchers from the University of Haifa compared adults who suffer from brain injuries with those who have the mental disorder. According to the team, these two conditions have similar characteristics. more...

  • Impulsive children may have self-control issues as adults, according to study

    Lack of self-control may be an issue that appears as early as childhood. According to researchers from Duke University, kids who score low on measures of self-control are more likely to experience social and behavioral problems as adults. more...

  • High school senior creates YouTube video about suicide prevention

    According to the National Institute of Mental Health, suicide is the third leading cause of death among young Americans between the ages of 15 and 24, behind unintentional injuries such as car accidents and homicide. more...

  • Surgeon General speaks out about childhood obesity and depression

    According to research conducted by PBS, major depression affects approximately 15 million American adults - or about 8 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older - in a given year. New research is suggesting that children who are obese may be at a greater risk for developing this condition. more...

  • Author tours the U.S. to end "ex-gay" organizations

    According to the National Education Policy Center, more than 85 percent of lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered (LGBT) students report being harassed because of their sexual or gender identity. In addition, more than 20 percent report being physically attacked. more...

  • Teen and adult weightlifters increasingly abusing HGH

    The Office of National Drug Control Policy reports that mental health problems, including depression, developmental lags, apathy, withdrawal and other psychosocial dysfunctions, are frequently linked to substance abuse among adolescents. more...

  • Study shows meditation may improve mindfulness and memory

    A new study published in the journal Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging suggests that meditation can produce changes in the brain in regions that are associated with memory, sense of self, empathy and stress. The researchers surveyed 16 individuals who participated in the eight-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program at the University of Massachusetts Center for Mindfulness. more...

  • New study suggests female bully victims more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol

    A study by researchers from the University of Washington suggests that teen girls who are victims of bullying may be at a higher risk for substance abuse as a result of depression. The report, which is published in Prevention Science, surveyed 1,495 tenth grade students from across the country. more...

  • Study shows many teens with mental health issues are not receiving proper care

    According to a recent study, only half of adolescents who suffer from severely impairing mental disorders receive proper treatment for their condition. The study, which was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, reveals that only one-third of teens with mental disorders receive care for their illness. more...

  • Research shows deaf children are more frequently maltreated than their hearing peers

    New research from the Rochester Institute of Technology reveals that neglect, physical and sexual abuse occur more frequently to children who are deaf or hard of hearing. According to the study, which was presented at the 2010 annual meeting of the Association of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, maltreatment is 25 percent more common in children who are hearing-impaired. more...

  • Study reveals children with ADHD and PBD have abnormal brain patterns

    According to research from the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), brain imaging may reveal differences in the brains of teens with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The study is published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. more...

  • High school teacher aims to curb teen drug use

    The Office of National Drug Control Policy reports that mental health problems, including depression, developmental lags, apathy, withdrawal and other psychosocial dysfunctions, are frequently linked to substance abuse among adolescents. more...

  • Study reveals that pregnant teens may be more impulsive than their peers

    According to new research, teenage girls who get pregnant may demonstrate impulsivity in other areas of their lives. The Globe and Mail reports that an associate professor of psychology at the University of Windsor in Canada is conducting the study. Participants were asked to fill out personality tests and complete quizzes involving pictures, memory and reactions. more...

  • Students who are treated for colds at college health centers may have depression

    According to research conducted by PBS, major depression affects approximately 15 million American adults - or about 8 percent of the U.S. population - age 18 and older in a given year. As a result, a growing number of researchers are aiming to identify a way to prevent teens from developing serious depression. more...

  • Researchers find that expressing worries before a stressful situation may be beneficial

    In the latest issue of the journal Science, research from the University of Chicago shows that students who write about their anxiety before a test may perform better. For the study, the scientists asked 20 college students to take two short math tests. more...

  • Researchers find that children's successes and failures can be influenced by their friends

    According to researchers from the University of Oregon, the friends that teens make as they move from elementary school to middle school may signify their future successes or failures. The study, which is published in the Journal of Early Adolescence, looked at the data of 1,278 students, 55 percent of whom were girls, from a previous study. more...

  • Researchers make advances in PTSD research

    New research by scientists at the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) may help treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other anxiety conditions. The findings are published in the journal Science. more...

  • Increase in teen medical marijuana use may be result of legalization

    As medical marijuana becomes legal in many states throughout the U.S., some experts wonder what the impact will be on teen drug use. In an effort to find the answer, officials in Colorado are studying the effects of legalizing the drug on teen usage in the state, The White Mountain Independent reports. more...

  • Texas school district aims to reprimand 'sext' offenders

    In recent weeks, officials at the Freeport Intermediate School District in Texas have reacted to allegations of sexual assault via cyberbullying. News channel KHOU reports that many parents are concerned about inappropriate images of young girls that have potentially been forwarded to many students. more...

  • Parents try to raise awareness about the many faces of teen drug abuse

    In response to a growing teen drug use problem, one parent is trying to prove that all substance abusers do not look the same. My West Texas reports that Josie Alvarez - a parent in the Midland Independent School District - is hosting a forum on teen drug use prevention. more...

  • Child advocacy service notes shortage in male mentors for foster children

    In Roseville, California, Don Genasci works as a Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) for Child Advocates of Placer County. According to the Roseville Press Tribune, the organization has about 170 volunteers, but Genasci is one of very few men. more...

  • Proposed bill may make synthetic marijuana illegal in Indiana

    Synthetic marijuana, which is also known as spice, could be illegal in some states within the next few months. This week, the Senate's Corrections, Criminal and Civil Matters Committee voted unanimously to support a bill that could potentially make the substance illegal in Indiana, the Indy Star reports. more...

  • Research shows children who survive a natural disaster may suffer from PTS

    According to new research by a psychologist from the University of Miami, children who live through a severe hurricane may show signs of post-traumatic stress (PTS) - such as having reoccurring dreams, being tense or distracted, and feeling sad or fearful - years after the trauma. The study, which is published in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, is called Hurricane-Related Exposure Experiences and Stressors, Other Life Events, and Social Support: Concurrent and Prospective Impact on Children's Persistent Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms. more...

  • New drug that helps mice overcome fear could help treat humans PTSD

    Researchers from the U.S. and Spain have recently discovered that 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone - a type of flavonoid - may suppress the fear that is associated with a traumatic experience. The study, which was led by scientists at Emory University and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, was recently published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. more...

  • Study reveals secondhand media exposure may influence body image

    According to a new study by researchers from Harvard Medical School, indirect media exposure - or having friends who watch television - may be damaging to a teen's body image regardless of whether they have a TV at home. more...

  • Improperly implanted contraceptives result in potential teen pregnancies

    In an effort to prevent pregnancy, many woman choose slow-release contraceptives that are implanted for as many as three years. However, according to the Guardian, more than 500 women in the UK became pregnant as a result of a faulty contraceptive implant known as Implanon. more...

  • Study shows students with disabilities are increasingly attending college

    According to a recent study by SRI International - an independent research organization - the number of young adults with special needs who participate in volunteer or community service has grown from 13 percent in 2009 to 25 percent in 2005. In addition, the number of students with savings accounts grew from 44 percent in 1990 to 56 percent in 2005. more...

  • Oregon facing critical prescription drug abuse issues

    According to a study done by the National Center On Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, between 1993 to 2005, teen usage of prescription drugs increased by 93 percent. In some states, the number of teens who are abusing these substances has become an issue of significant proportions. more...

  • Community seeks to prevent minors from access to alcohol

    Recent research has suggested that teens may not have difficulty obtaining alcohol. One method of acquiring the substance is to get it from older friends and siblings. In an effort to curtail this practice, the Beacon Coalition - which is run by the Newburyport, Massachusetts Youth Services department - is launching a campaign aimed at preventing 20- to- 25-year-olds from providing alcohol to minors, Newburyport News reports. more...

  • Underage drinking and driving becoming a major issue in Texas

    Drinking and driving is a serious issue, but the problem can be even worse for teens. In order to uncover why more efforts are not taken to prevent intoxicated driving among adolescents, the Dallas Morning News investigated the Texas legal system. more...

  • States aim to curtail teen bullying in schools

    As teen bullying becomes a national issue, many school districts are implementing prevention plans in an effort to curtail this trend. However, many of these initiatives may be ineffective at best, according to The Boston Globe. more...

  • Bullying victim opens up about former abuse and recovery from depression

    As a result of incessant bullying, many teens suffer from severe bouts of depression, anxiety and even suicidal thoughts. In an effort to prevent other teens from feeling helpless, high school student Kate McGlynn-Moore spoke with The Daily Courier about her past experiences. more...

  • County receives approval for teen pregnancy prevention funding

    Teen pregnancy is a national issue that has been highlighted in recent years, due in part to television shows such as MTV's Teen Mom. In an effort to prevent teen pregnancy, the Graham County Board of Supervisors in Arizona recently approved next year's budget for programs, the Eastern Arizona Courier reports. The county's teen prevention initiatives were recently re-approved for $100,000 in funding through 2011. more...

  • Texas county faces growing heroin problem among teens

    According to the Greater Dallas Council of Alcohol and Drug Abuse, the number of heroin addicts seeking treatment in Dallas County has nearly doubled, many of whom are teenagers. The number of teens who have received treatment for this addiction in the county has increased from 33 in 2005 to 215 in 2010, news channel KDAF reports. more...

  • TV personality Dr. Drew Pinsky joins drug abuse prevention campaign

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, one in five high school students has taken a prescription drug that was not prescribed for them by a doctor. In addition, 2,500 young people use a prescription pain reliever to get high for the first time every day. more...

  • Study reveals children without friends may develop depression as adolescents

    According to Canadian researchers, children who have no friends may risk developing depression as a teenager. United Press International reports that William Bukowski of Concordia University in Montreal found that having at least one friend can be beneficial for shy children. The study involved 130 girls and 101 boys in third through fifth grade. more...

  • Teens may need parents to notice signs of depression

    According to the Greenwich Citizen, teens may have periods of depression, but lasting sadness can be a sign of a more serious issue. The pressures of adolescence, ranging from academic competitiveness to peer relationships, can be overwhelming for some young adults. more...

  • Research reveals autistic teens may not grow out of handwriting difficulties

    According to new research from the Kennedy Krieger Institute, children who have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may not grow out of their struggles with handwriting. Psych Central reports that researchers studied 24 children between the ages of 12 and 16, half of which had an ASD. more...

  • Alternative therapy may be beneficial to those with mental illnesses

    In recent years, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) has focused on promoting mind and body health practices for those who live with major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other diagnoses. The initiative is called Hearts and Minds and focuses on providing people with resources for alternative therapies. more...

  • Alternative therapy may be beneficial to those with mental illnesses

    In recent years, the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) has focused on promoting mind and body health practices for those who live with major depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and other diagnoses. The initiative is called Hearts and Minds and focuses on providing people with resources for alternative therapies. more...

  • Teen discusses former addiction with peers

    Although recent trends in youth drug use have shown the first significant downturn, they remain at high levels, the Office of National Drug Control Policy reports. In an effort to prevent teens from trying and potentially becoming addicted to drugs, a number of communities are hosting youth outreach programs. more...

  • Autistic teen wins award for tennis

    In recent months, many autistic teens have made headlines for their impressive accomplishments. Among them is Jason Furlong of Miami, Florida, who was recently presented the Jimmy Gantt Memorial Award from the U.S. Tennis Association, the Miami Herald reports. more...

  • Cyberbullying may be worse for teens than other forms of harassment

    This past year, many teens have taken their own results as a result of being cyberbullied. According to the Cyberbullying Research Center, the act is defined as "when someone repeatedly harasses, mistreats or makes fun of another person online or while using cell phones or other electronic devices." more...

  • Research shows difference in bully and victim thought patterns

    New research from RMIT University in Australia shows that teenage bullies and their victims may have distorted thought patterns that can affect their emotional and social functioning. Dr. Geraldine Abdilla studied 1,086 teenagers for her research. more...

  • New report shows decline in teen birth rate

    According to a new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), fewer teen girls had babies in 2009 than in previous years. CNN reports that CDC research shows fewer American women overall are giving birth. more...

  • Helpline may benefit depressed teens

    In an effort to help troubled teens, a growing number of mental health organizations are launching help lines. These initiatives are designed to give people an outlet for their problems, as well as provide treatment options. more...

  • At-risk youth program pairs teens with toddlers

    In recent months, many school districts have come up with unique ways to prevent at-risk teens from engaging in destructive behavior. For example, in England, a program called Teens and Toddlers sets up aggressive high school students with kindergarten learners in order to "soften them up," according to the Guardian. more...

  • Teen with Asperger's writes, produces and directs film

    Despite being diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome, Alyssa Huber, an 18-year-old from Chicago, recently wrote, directed and produced a film. ABC News reports that Huber's film, which is titled Cursed Waters, is a comedy about a boy who loses his job and becomes a pirate. more...

  • College students may drink too heavily when studying abroad

    Recent research from Loyola Marymount University suggests that American college students who participate in study abroad programs often have incorrect views of normal drinking. According to researchers, many students believe that alcohol is readily available in other countries and that it will make traveling more fun. more...

  • Depressed teen holds students hostage

    This week, a high school student in France held 20 preschool children and their teacher hostage, the Indie Pro Pub reports. The teen, who is currently on medication for depression, used swords to threaten the class, according to Luc Chatel, French Ministry of Education. more...

  • Parents of autistic children may want to take a few steps to prepare their kids for the holidays

    Families who have children with autism can experience challenges during the holidays. This time of year often brings parties, seasonal foods and a break from routines, which can be disruptive to an autistic child. more...

  • Former foster child featured on TeenNick for advocacy efforts

    Teen advocacy groups can have a huge impact on their communities. For example, Lauren Huichan, a young woman from New Mexico, was an at-risk youth before becoming involved with community activities. more...

  • Wilderness therapy specialists aim to educate permissive parents

    In recent weeks, two specialists from a wilderness therapy program gave a presentation about permissive parenting to the Independent Educational Consultants Association in Cincinnati. The program - which was called Help, My Child's Entitled! Working with Permissive Parents in the Post-Boomer Family - revealed parenting trends of this generation over the past 30 years. more...

  • Children raised in apartment buildings have higher levels of cigarette chemicals

    According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, early experimenters and smokers are more likely than nonsmokers to experience various behavioral problems by grade 12. However, according to a new study, children may be exposed to the dangerous chemicals in cigarettes without actually smoking. more...

  • Parents claim schools are not doing enough to stop bullying

    Bullying has becomes a major issue across the country as a result of the recent suicides of teens who had been harassed. The Spec spoke to several teens and their parents who said that schools and police still are not doing enough to prevent this issue. more...

  • Parents raise awareness about academic pressures among children

    In order to address the growing issue of children who are stressed over the pressure to succeed, a parent-teacher association (PTA) screened a film called Race to Nowhere, Albany Patch reports. The movie focuses on the physical and emotional problems that kids can face when they are pushed too hard, including eating disorders, depression and suicide. more...

  • Teen courts may be more effective than traditional justice systems

    In South Dakota, law enforcement officials have instituted a new type of criminal justice system. Teen court, which was designed as an alternative to juvenile court, allows adolescents to act as jurors, bailiffs, clerks, prosecutors and defense attorneys, Tonic reports. The only adults present are the judge, who works in the juvenile court system, and parent volunteers. more...

  • Man encourages other sexual assault victims to report the crime

    Sexual assault is a crime that some believe only happens to women. However, men can also be victims of sexual crimes. For example, Grant Watkins, a 45-year-old from Minnesota, wrote a book titled Unpinned: Breaking the Hold of Sexual Assault and Abuse about his experiences during his young adulthood, the El Paso Times reports. more...

  • Police and school officials seek to address teen cyberbullying

    A district judge recently issued a court order last week that bans an Aspen High School student from using Facebook, Twitter or other electronic methods to talk about a classmate that she allegedly victimized online, Aspen Daily News reports. The punishment is part of a mandatory restraining order that was issued by the judge, and the girl could face three criminal charges related to the alleged online bullying. more...

  • Filmmaker aims to end teen bullying

    Government statistics show that about 30 percent of students have experienced some kind of bullying. However, filmmaker J.C. Pohl - co-creator of the anti-bullying program Teen Truth Live - believes that the number is closer to 99 percent, Whittier Daily News reports. more...

  • Research suggests that bullying may impair cognitive function

    Martin Teicher, a neuroscientist, recently conducted a study that suggests children who are constantly tormented by their peers have the same behavioral issues as those who suffer from physical abuse, Care2 reports. more...

  • Supportive parents may prevent suicidal thoughts in LGBT teens

    A new report published in the November issue of the Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing suggests that lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) children can significantly benefit from parental acceptance and support, Live Science reports. more...

  • School teaches parents and children about bullying prevention

    Tracy Ferreira, a counselor at Garner Magnet High School, recently launched an anti-bullying week at the school, the Garner Citizen reports. more...

  • Helplines may be useful for depressed teens

    Teens who are experiencing depression can become increasingly isolated, and often feel like they have no one to talk to. Many times, a web or telephone help service can be a crucial last resort, according to Toronto City News. more...

  • Social worker creates running program for depressed teens

    Dan McGann coaches a 12-week program that is aimed at helping teenagers deal with depression and anxiety issues. The Toronto City News reports that the social worker founded the Teen Run group therapy program in 2006, after battling depression himself. more...

  • Woman recovers from PTSD symptoms

    Michelle Renee is a woman who has overcome Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). According to Global Shift, the mother of one endured an abusive childhood. She became a teen runaway who eventually climbed to success as a bank executive by the age of 30. more...

  • Teens with autism can find individual success

    Antonio Henderson-Davis is one of the most popular students at his high school. The teen, who has autism, has become a YouTube rap sensation, according to the Star Tribune. Henderson-Davis is also a reserve defensive tackle for his school's football team. more...

  • Disruptive behavioral disorders may contribute to car crashes in teen boys

    New research has found that male teens with disruptive behavior disorders have a one-third increased risk of being seriously injured in a traffic crash, either as a driver or a pedestrian. more...

  • NJ passes anti-bullying regulation

    In recent weeks, the U.S. House of Representatives introduced the Tyler Clementi Higher Education Anti-Harassment Act, which requires all colleges that receive federal aid to amend their harassment policies, as well as provide funding to help schools start anti-bullying programs, the Daily Illini reports. more...

  • Teens grow more compassionate with age, according to new research

    Parents who grow frustrated with their adolescent's seeming inability to understand others who have different points of view may be unaware of how teen brains develop. more...

  • Community members aim to end teen drunk driving

    Five residents of a California community have come together to try to address the problem of teen drinking and driving. They are asking the community to get involved in reducing teen speeding and DUIs with the goal of not losing any more children to death or maiming from such accidents, Mercury News reports. more...

  • Teen with autism overcomes shyness through football

    A teenager in Gwinnett County recently told CBS Atlanta that his love for football and his faith helped him overcome his autism. Cortland Hale was diagnosed with the condition when he was three years old. After joining the football team like his brother, Cortland says the team spirit of the game helped him overcome his communication problems and his shyness. more...

  • Teen boys with ADHD at greater risk for car collisions

    Researchers at the University of Toronto have found that teenage boys with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and other childhood disruptive behavior disorders are more likely than other teens to be involved in motor vehicle collisions. more...

  • Mother speaks about her daughter's recovery from anorexia

    A mother of a woman who is formerly anorexic recently spoke about her daughter's condition with ABC News. Susan Blackmore eventually told her daughter that her eating disorder was unwelcome in their home. more...

  • Alcoholic whipped cream considered dangerous by some

    A new product on the food market is making college officials nervous. The item is whipped cream that has been infused with alcohol. more...

  • New test uses MRI to determine ASD diagnosis

    Researchers have developed a new test that changes the way autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are diagnosed. ASDs are currently diagnosed through a symptom-based test, in which a health-care provider observes a patient for the characteristics outlined in the psychology reference book The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV, MSNBC reports. more...

  • Teens with acne may be at a higher risk for depression

    The connection between acne and depression has long been documented, especially in teens. Some experts attributed this to particular medications for acne such as isotretinoin, CNN reports. However, a recent study in the British Medical Journal found that the drug itself may not matter; according to Swedish researchers, acne itself raises the risk of depression and suicide attempt. more...

  • Adopted teen finds success

    November is Adoption Awareness Month and the Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia (AFABC) have released some facts about adoption. The Vancouver Observer reports that only 10 to 15 percent of BC's 1,000 children who are registered for adoption are babies. Approximately 20 percent are sibling groups and 30 percent are teens. more...

  • Parents can take steps to help bullied children

    Bullying can begin in children who are as young as four years old, according to the Portland Press Herald. In order to prevent or address this behavior, parents can take a few steps to ensure that safety is the priority. more...

  • Alcohol and caffeine are an unhealthy mix for teens

    In recent weeks, alcoholic energy drinks such as Four Loko have made headlines for endangering the health of many teenagers. While experts agree that alcohol and caffeine should not be mixed, as of yet there are no studies explaining why. more...

  • U.S. government aims to help end bullying

    A study by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development estimated that 1.7 million U.S. children in grades six through 10 could be identified as bullies. The study found that 10.6 percent of students reported bullying others "sometimes" and 8.8 percent admitted to bullying others "once a week" or more, Montgomery Advertiser reports. more...

  • Teen creates walk for Tourette Syndrome research

    In support of Tourette Syndrome (TS) research, a teen spent her summer vacation preparing the Mendham Walks for TS, which is the first in the New Jersey Walks for TS series of awareness events. more...

  • College student commits suicide after consuming Four Loko

    In recent weeks, a wrongful death lawsuit has been filed against Phusion Projects Inc. after a Florida man got drunk on Four Loko - a controversial alcoholic energy drink - and shot himself in the head with a pistol, Absolute Lawsuits reports. more...

  • Report reveals how poverty can affect children's health

    According to a new report by the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, being poor for even a short period of time can have lasting health implications for children. Approximately 15.5 million children are living in poverty in the U.S., which accounts for one in five children, according to the Census Bureau. more...

  • Glee episode focuses on gay teen bullying

    Many teens are familiar with the hit television show Glee. The musical-comedy-drama features a group of high school students in a glee club that struggle with different types of social drama, both serious and comedic, The Phoenix reports. more...

  • New system of coaching may help students with ADHD

    New research suggests that college students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may benefit for a new model of coaching used by the Edge Foundation, a nonprofit organization that offers supplemental treatment for students with ADHD. The results of the study are being released this week at the Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD) conference in Atlanta. more...

  • Parents can help teens through depression

    According to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, each year, about 100,000 Americans under the age of 24 attempt suicide and approximately 5,000 succeed. more...

  • Former movie star gives advice to troubled young women

    In recent years, tabloids have been filled with accounts of the addiction and mental health issues that many young singers and actresses are facing in Hollywood. These girls often face the same pressures as normal teens their age, but with the added spotlight of fame. more...

  • Adopted teen will celebrate Thanksgiving with his siblings

    This year, Thanksgiving will finally be a joyous occasion for adopted teen Sharrieff Moore. For the first time since he can remember, he expects to celebrate the holiday with his entire family, The Southfield Jay reports. more...

  • Marie Osmond opens up about son's suicide

    In the wake of many teen suicides across the country, Marie Osmond, television personality and pop icon, is opening up about the loss of her son. This week, the star was on the Oprah show to discuss the pain she experienced at the death of depressed Michael Bryan, Monsters and Critics reports. more...

  • Student breakfast foundation awards school for nutrition efforts

    This week, the got breakfast? Foundation presented its first-ever Silent Hero Performance Award to Buffalo Public Schools in New York in recognition of their achievement in implementing a successful Breakfast in the Classroom program. In addition, the foundation presented them with a grant for $5,000. more...

  • Teens win GRAMMYs for anti-drug songs

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institute of Health (NIH) partnered with MusiCares and the GRAMMY Foundation to honor teen musicians during National Drug Facts Week. more...

  • Teen with autism becomes advocate

    At two years old, Taylor Morris was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and her mother was told that her daughter might never talk, or leave home. However, fifteen years later, Morris is dispensing hope to other autistic children and their families, The Capital reports. more...

  • Study shows children suffer in homes of parents with PTSD

    Military members have a high incidence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) upon returning from a tour of duty. However, research shows that children of these individuals can suffer from depression and trauma because of their parent's condition, The Star reports. more...

  • High school creates drug tip texting program

    According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, prescription abuse by teens exceeds marijuana use, and there are as many new abusers - age 12 and older - of pain relievers as there are for marijuana. As a result, a growing number of parents, law enforcement officials and school districts are seeking to curtail drug use. more...

  • Study shows teen girls are more likely to engage in unprotected sex their first time

    New research indicates that teenage girls are 30 percent more likely than boys to have unprotected sex the first time they have sexual intercourse, regardless of any previous sex education instruction, WebMD reports. more...

  • Boxing program teaches girls about self-esteem

    Raised in a devout Quaker household, Cece CuzaHoward never imagined that she would learn how to punch. However, a new program in California is teaching girls self-esteem through boxing, the LA Times reports. more...

  • Study suggests hyper-texting teens are more likely to engage in at-risk behavior

    New research has shown that teens who text 120 times a day or more are more likely to have had sex or to have used alcohol and drugs than kids who do not send as many messages. The study's authors are not suggesting that "hyper-texting" leads to sex, drinking or drugs, but they say that it is startling to see an apparent link between excessive messaging and that kind of risky behavior, the Associated Press reports. more...

  • Government program declares National Drug Facts Week

    According to the 2006 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, teens abuse prescription medications more than all illegal drugs combined, with the exception of marijuana. Many teens are under the misconception that these highly addictive and often easily accessible medications are safer than illicit drugs. more...

  • Survey of local high school students reveals rise in prescription drug use

    A survey of alcohol and drug use among Sumner County students in Tennessee reveals that binge drinking and the use of prescription drugs are on the rise, according to the school system's annual student report. The survey was commissioned by the Sumner County Anti-Drug Coalition, which is a group of local leaders in education and health who hope to use the results to track the performance of programs that are aimed at promoting healthier lifestyles among teens, the Tennessean reports. more...

  • Parent diagnosed with Asperger's after researching her children's conditions

    In late October, Dena Gassner, a 1980 graduate of Union College, returned to her alma mater to share her expertise in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), the school reports. More than a dozen teachers, counselors and aids from the Knox County School System joined Gassner for a presentation on understanding the challenges that are faced by students with ASDs. more...

  • Teen with Asperger's receives Cadet training award

    This past week, Canadian native Aidan Guerra received a red and green ribboned medal, which identifies him as this year's Alberta recipient of the Major-General Howard Award for achievement in academics, community service and cadet training. The achievement is prestigious; however, it holds more meaning for Guerra, the Vancouver Sun reports. more...

  • Parents should support LGBT teens, gay adult writes

    The term "bullying" often refers to someone who habitually intimidates weaker people. Although it is usually used to describe how a student treats his or her peer, it can also be used for parents, according to Darren Rosenblum, writer for the Huffington Post. more...

  • School program aims to help pregnant teens

    During the 2009-2010 academic year, there were 37 teen girls enrolled in the Graduation, Reality and Dual-Role Skills (GRADS) program in Fairborne, Ohio. The purpose of GRADS is to empower teen parents to set realistic goals and to remain in school until graduation, according to the FHS NewsHawk. more...

  • Organization aims to promote adoption of teens

    In recent weeks, Family Services of Northwestern Pennsylvania has organized a training program to bring together adoptive parents and professionals who place children into foster homes. The program features an array of experts, including Debbie Riley, author of "Beneath the Mask: Understanding Adopted Teens," and Rita Soronen, executive director of the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, according to GoErie.com. Thomas - the founder of Wendy's Restaurants - was both an adoptee and an adoptive father; the restaurant chain is named after one of his daughters. more...

  • CDC releases report on tobacco prevention programs

    A new report released today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that rates of adult cigarette smoking and smokeless tobacco use vary widely from state to state, depending on how effectively they have implemented strategies to reduce tobacco use. more...

  • Study reveals teen bullying statistics

    According to a new study, approximately half of all high school students surveyed said that they have bullied someone in the last year. Also, nearly half said that they have been the target of bullying, teasing or taunting in ways that seriously upset them, according to the LA Times. more...

  • Organization seeks to raise mental health awareness

    In order to help raise awareness and funds that empower youth to eradicate the stigma of mental illness, the Let's Erase the Stigma (LETS) Educational Foundation continues to implement innovative fundraising events. LETS will hold their First Annual Benefit and Silent Auction this week. The evening will include performances by a youth jazz band and awards presented to LETS high schoolers as well as other community leaders. more...

  • Study shows oral sex leads to intercourse in teens

    According to a new study published in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, oral sex can be a precursor to teenagers having intercourse. The study surveyed more than 600 high school students in California to report on their sexual experiences. The participants were asked to fill out surveys twice a year, from the beginning of ninth grade to the end of 11th grade, CNN reports. more...

  • Study reveals that teen girls are at higher risk for depression relapse

    A new study reveals that although most teenagers can recover from major depression, nearly half will have a recurrence of the condition. Researchers found that 96 percent of depressed teens recovered with treatment, but nearly half relapsed with another episode of major depression within five years, WebMD reports. more...

  • Smartphone app tracks mental health

    Apple recently released an application (app) for its iPhone, which seeks to monitor the mental health of its user. The app was created to help the military keep track of the emotions of soldiers to prevent conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, but the technology may also be useful to teens. more...

  • Disney star Demi Lovato enters rehab

    This week, Disney star Demi Lovato checked into rehab for emotional and physical issues she has dealt with for some time, according to her representative. MTV reports that the young actress and singer left the worldwide Jonas Brothers tour she was performing on to attend a treatment facility for a potential eating disorder and self-mutilation. The singer also shut down her Twitter page over the weekend. more...

  • Adopted teen's life becomes film

    This week, a movie about adopted teen India Meadow is being shown to promote the Bates Foundation, which provides custom-made prom dresses to underprivileged or hard-to-fit adolescents from Chicago's inner city. The troubled teen's life was turned around by Barbara Bates, a Chicago fashion designer and founder of the foundation, news channel ABC reports. Now their story has been made into a film called India of K-Town. more...

  • Community bans sale of synthetic marijuana

    A small county in Indiana recently banned the sale of synthetic marijuana within the community. As lawmakers consider legislation to possibly forbid the use of such substances, including K2 and Spice, county officials felt it was best to get a head start, The Brazil Times reports. more...

  • Teen with Asperger's wins recognition at LA Music Awards

    This week, John and Noni Gauder, grandparents of the widely successful singer and songwriter, Sarah Lonsert, spoke to The Village Daily Sun about their granddaughter's struggle with Asperger's syndrome. more...

  • Community holds conference on teen dating violence

    This week, a psychotherapist from Arizona will be the keynote speaker at a conference for domestic violence. The topic of the event is teen dating violence, TriValleyCentral.com reports. more...

  • Late-night texting may cause major health issues for teens

    Recent research shows that teens who text or surf the Internet past bedtime can suffer from sleep deprivation-related issues during the day. more...

  • Teen with Asperger's Syndrome saves grandfather's life

    This week, Joe Posavitz's life was saved by his grandson. Ryan Reed, the 16-year-old teenager who saved his grandfather, has Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism. more...

  • Community seeks to end teen drug abuse

    This week, a small town is Connecticut is holding a meeting to bring awareness to prescription drug abuse, which is the leading cause of death for teens in the state. more...

  • Student with OCD faces complications related to her condition at school

    A high school student is complaining after she got in trouble for wearing colorful wigs to school. However, the teen has an obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) that causes her to pull out her hair. more...

  • Golf helps teen with autism

    Current research suggests that alternative therapies, such as wilderness programs, are beneficial in the treatment of teenagers with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). Charlie Bristow, a 13-year-old with an ASD, has been taking golf lessons and practicing at the driving range, news channel WCCO reports. more...

  • Adderall abuse on the rise

    According to a study done by the National Center On Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, between 1993 to 2005 teen usage of prescription drugs increased 93 percent. more...

  • Pennsylvania transit authority making efforts to curtail DUIs

    In an effort to prevent motorists from driving while under the influence of prescription and over-the-counter medication, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) and the Pennsylvania State Police are launching a campaign. PennDOT will work with state and municipal police departments throughout the week before Halloween to step up impaired-driving enforcement, with increased emphasis on driving under the influence of drugs. more...

  • Teen finds relief from anxiety after receiving service dog

    In order to help teens with emotional and psychological conditions, a number of mental health programs are giving adolescents service dogs to help them with their daily routines. For example, Montana native Seth Marshall - a teen who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, social anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder - noticed that his life improved drastically after receiving a service dog, news channel KULR8 reports. more...

  • Teen with Tourette's raises money for children with special needs

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, findings show that 3 out of every 1,000 children between the ages of six and 17 suffer from Tourette's Syndrome. more...

  • Parents start teen music program to promote self-esteem

    Two parents from Needham, Massachusetts founded Plugged In, which is a teen music program designed to promote self-esteem. The Christian Science Monitor reports that over the past nine years, the program has affected the lives of about 400 teenagers. more...

  • Research suggests half of U.S. teens have a mental disorder

    According to a new study, around half of U.S. teens meet the criteria for a mental disorder and nearly one in four report having a mood, behavior or anxiety disorder that interferes with daily life. The study, which is published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, shows that 51 percent of boys and 49 percent of girls between the ages of 13 and 19 years old have a mood, behavior, anxiety or substance use disorder. more...

  • Movie star admits former self-esteem issues

    This week, Rachael Leigh Cook, who rose to fame with the movie She's All That, recently told the media that she is on a campaign against Photoshop. Pop Eater reports that the starlet believes doctored images of celebrities have a potentially negative effect on young people's self-esteem. more...

  • Teen with neuropsychiatric illnesses designs successful line of t-shirts

    According to the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, as many as one in 200 children and adolescents struggle with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). more...

  • Study shows teens unlikely to admit illegal substance abuse, even before drug test

    New research by Wayne State University and Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit shows that teens may deny drug use, even in the face of an impending positive drug test. more...

  • Youth ministry organization seeks to help troubled teens

    In an effort to help teens who are suffering from severe depression, self-mutilation and addiction, Scott Brinson founded My Broken Place, a youth ministry organization that seeks to offer hope. more...

  • Underage drinking still a major issue for many teens

    Underage and excessive drinking by high school and college students has been recognized as a problem for a long time, but recent studies have confirmed that rates of binge drinking are continuing to rise. more...

  • CDC reports that sex education may lead to lower rates of teen pregnancy

    According to new research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there is a large disparity in rates of teen pregnancy between states, with Southern states often having much higher rates, All Headline News reports. more...

  • Long Island parents, police and school officials seek to curb teen drug use

    Each month, parents of Long Island teenagers meet for Drug Free Massapequa meetings. The initiative is designed to curtail the number of teen overdoses and fatalities that are related to recreational drug use. more...

  • Program seeks to raise awareness of cyber security among teens

    More than half of American teens worry about safety on the Internet and know someone their age who has been targeted by hurtful electronic communications, according to survey results recently released by the Chicago youth-market research firm TRU. Nearly a third of surveyed teens have been targets themselves, The Christian Science Monitor reports. more...

  • Schools across the country are issuing Fat Talk Free Week

    According to the National Eating Disorders Association, as many as 10 million women are living with some type of eating disorder. In an effort to help women improve their self-esteem, the University of Missouri-Kansas City has issued a Fat Talk Free Week, which is a national campaign to eliminate language harmful to body image, KansasCity.com reports. more...

  • Study may help doctors more effectively treat children with OCD

    New research is showing doctors how to better predict how a child with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) may respond to treatment. United Press International reports that researchers from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center in Providence, Rhode Island say OCD is an anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, unwanted thoughts or obsessions, in addition to repetitive behaviors or compulsions. more...

  • Survey shows increase in teen marijuana use

    According to data collected by the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, more kids and teens are smoking marijuana at younger ages. more...

  • Parents can help teens with ADHD stay calm and organized

    Teens who have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often need to follow daily rules in order to stay focused and organized. To reduce the daily stress of keeping a routine, parents of ADHD sufferers can follow a few simple behaviors to help their child, ADDitude reports. more...

  • Meditation may help alleviate stress and anxiety

    According to researchers from Emory University, a meditation practice invented more than 1,000 years ago may have real health benefits for people today. CNN reports that the scientists are looking at how an ancient Tibetan Buddhist meditation practice called Lojong may help reduce stress. more...

  • Apple creates iPhone app to prevent teen sexting

    In an effort to prevent teen sexting, Apple's latest iPhone app will clean up text messages. more...

  • Parents have many tools to help their bullied child

    Victims of bullying are often chosen for reasons outside of their control, such as physical appearance, disability, perceived sexual orientation and jealousy, among others. Parents may not be able to prevent teen bullying, but they can address the issue once it occurs, Psychology Today reports. more...

  • Teen girls may have increased health risks associated with heavy drinking

    Although alcohol addiction is often seen as a men's issue, this condition is increasingly affecting women across the country. Often this problem begins during teen years, when adolescent girls are exposed to alcohol at parties and social settings. While teenagers may act as though their partying is a passing phase, many cannot escape their growing addiction. This issue has immediate repercussions, but long-term health problems may exist as well. more...

  • Children with ADHD may be more likely to become depressed

    Children who have been diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often have more challenges to overcome than their peers. Recent research shows that these challenges may include depression and suicidal ideation. more...

  • Self-injury increasingly common among girls with eating disorders

    In recent years, many specialists have noticed a startling trend among eating disorder patients. Self-injurious behavior is becoming increasingly common among those with these conditions. more...

  • Reality TV star "Snooki" admits former eating disorder

    As many as 10 million females suffer from eating disorders in the U.S., and more than half of teenage girls engage in unhealthy weight-control behaviors, according to the National Eating Disorders Association. Because of the secretiveness and shame associated with anorexia and bulimia, the conditions often go untreated. more...

  • National survey reveals teen drug abuse on the rise

    In a recent National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), increases in teen drug use of prescription medications and marijuana show that there is a great need for parent involvement. more...

  • Study shows that people with ADHD may benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy

    In a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, researchers demonstrate how adding cognitive behavioral therapy - an approach that teaches skills for handling life challenges and revising negative thought patterns - to pharmaceutical treatment for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) significantly improved symptom control in a study of adult patients. more...

  • Autistic teen's wish comes true

    Individuals who have been diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder are often fascinated with, or interested in, one particular subject. Jake Devine of Olathe, Kansas, an autistic young adult, loves tow trucks, KansasCity.com reports. more...

  • Study reveals that parents are unaware of their teens' participation in underage drinking

    A recent study conducted by the Maine Office of Substance Abuse reveals that many parents of high school students underestimate their teen's alcohol use. The Bangor Daily News reports that the statewide survey shows that only 26 percent of parents believe their teenagers have ever had more than a few sips of alcohol. more...

  • Pennsylvania liquor organization awards funding for underage drinking prevention

    In an effort to prevent underage and dangerous drinking, the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board (PLCB) recently announced that it will award grants totaling $903,522 to 72 organizations throughout the state. more...

  • Local communities make efforts to halt underage drunk drivers

    Underage drinking has many serious consequences such as drunk driving, alcohol poisoning, addiction and even death. In an effort to curtail this epidemic, a number of local communities are hosting meetings to discuss how to keep teens from drinking irresponsibly. more...